Oral Piercings & Your Oral Health Courtsey Of Your San Ramon Dentist

Body piercing has become more popular in the last 40 years and has evolved past the piercing of ears to include parts all over the body. It is a way of self-expression and many choose to pierce a part of their oral cavity not thinking about how it may affect their oral health.

Side Affects of an Oral Piercing:

  • Inflammation of the orifice
  • Allergic reaction to the metal (or material of the piercing)
  • Infection within the piercing
  • Increased bacteria growth
  • Choking hazard
  • Blood clots or blood poisoning
  • Pain or discomfort
  • Nerve damage

Symptoms After Receiving an Oral Piercing

After you receive an oral piercing, there are commercial cleaning solutions that you can use to help prevent infection. Try an alcohol-free, antimicrobial mouth rinse, but be careful not to rinse more than five times per day. Make sure to rinse your mouth for 30-60 seconds for optimal results.

You may also want to try rinsing your mouth with a quarter teaspoon of iodine-free salt dissolved in a cup of warm water to aid in the healing process. This solution can be used twice a day and should be swished around the mouth for about 15-30 seconds maximum.

Take the time to purchase a new toothbrush after a piercing in order to not introduce any old bacteria to the pierced area. A soft-bristled brush with a small head is advised, to gently brush around the area.

Avoid overuse of the pierced area, you may want to change your diet while healing and avoid kissing for a while.

When to Seek Help

Pain from a piercing can take up to a month to go away. If you see any signs of infection, extreme swelling, fever, chills, or red-streaks around the piercing, contact your doctor or San Ramon dentist immediately.